10 Basic things you MUST have in your PCH

Every home is different and should provide supports and services to meet the unique needs of the residents. As you begin to think about what population you plan to support, it will become clear what items you will need to help your clientele feel comfortable, safe and right at home.

If you are supporting children, consider what you need in the home to effectively support children. Keep in mind that the needs of the adolescent teen are very different from the needs of small children.

For homes that are set up as Memory Care programs, its important to consider safety measures for residents at risk of wandering or elopement.

Whether you are planning to operate a personal care home for senior citizens, children, homeless veterans, or people with mental health challenges there are basic items that every PCH should have to ensure the health and safety of its residents..

Below are 10 basic items you must have in your home.

These are the basics and not in any way the only safety items needed. This list is not exhaustive. There are and will be many other items that are required by your licensing board, state government or that you personally find useful.

  1. Smoke Detectors
  2. Carbon Monoxide
  3. Fire Extinguishers
  4. Fire Ladder
  5. First Aid Kit
  6. Emergency Food Supply
  7. Flash lights
  8. Batteries
  9. Wheel Chair Ramps
  10. Bedside Commode

If your regulations allow it, you may need door alarms and arm bracelet for those at risk of wandering or eloping.

So check our the rules and regulations in your area for setting up and operating a personal care home and go get what you need!

 

 

Need Clarity? Lets connect!

I know how tough it is getting a PCH off the ground. You gotta get a house, furniture, permits, inspections, zoning, and people in it!

Stop making yourself dizzy and crazy from the uncertainty of it all.

I’ve given tons and tons of information already on this blog to help you for free but sometimes that’s still not enough.

For me, having that personal touch is essential to my understanding and feeling comfortable. Maybe that’s true for you too.

Anyway, go ahead and send me an email if you need a clarity call. I’ll give you a FREE 15 minute clarity call  if that will make you feel a little more confident and clear about your goals to owning a personal care home.

This post will be taken down soon so act fast because I really can’t do this for an extended period of time, sounds fair?

I’ll be looking out for your email.

Email me at pchpolicies@gmail.com

Talk to you soon!

butterfly woman

Let’s Define Ownership

If you are or planning to be an owner of a Personal Care Home you should know the definition (according to Georgia Regs.) of an owner.

An “Owner” means any individual or any person affiliated with a corporation, partnership, or association with 10 percent or greater ownership interest in the facility providing care to persons under the license of the facility in this state and who:

1. purports to or exercises authority of the owner in a facility; or

2. applies to operate or operates a facility; or

3. maintains an office on the premises of a facility; or

4. resides at a facility; or

5. has direct access to persons receiving care at a facility; or

6. provides direct personal supervision of facility personnel by being immediately

available to provide assistance and direction during the time such facility services are being

provided; or

7. enters into a contract to acquire ownership of a facility.

New PCH Application and Processing Fees in Georgia

In Georgia, effective August 3, 2010, the Rules and Regulations for General Licensing and

Enforcement Requirements, Chapter 111-8-25 require all licensed or registered

programs regulated through the Division of Healthcare Facility Regulation (HFR),

Department of Community Health to pay licensure activity fees annually beginning with

2010. Fees for currently licensed or registered programs with licenses or registrations

that do not expire annually must be paid by October 31, 2010.

Personal Care Homes** Annually

< 25 beds $350 Annually

25 < 50 beds $750 Annually

> 50 beds $1,500 Annually

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION

Q: MAY I PAY THE APPLICATION FEE AT THE TIME I FILE THE APPLICATION TO

BECOME LICENSED AND PAY THE INITIAL LICENSURE FEE WHEN YOU GET

READY TO ISSUE MY LICENSE?

A: No, the rules require you to submit the application fee and the initial licensure fee at

the same time.

Q: IF I OPERATE A LICENSED FACILITY AND I AM INSPECTED BECAUSE OF A

COMPLAINT THAT IS FILED, DO I HAVE TO PAY $250 FOR THE INSPECTION?

A: No. We do not charge for routine complaint inspection visits. You would be charged

$250 if we had to do a follow-up visit on a periodic or full inspection visit and more

serious rule violations were found. The purpose of that follow-up would be to check to

make sure that you corrected the more serious violation that was identified during the

periodic survey.

Q: WHAT IF I CAN’T PAY THE LICENSURE FEES THAT ARE DUE BY OCTOBER

31ST?

A: If you do not pay the fees within 60 days of the due date, October 31, 2010, a late

fee of $150 is added to the amount you owe. If you have not paid the full amount that is

due by January 31, 2011, the Department may take an action to revoke your license for

non-payment of licensure fees. You would have the right to appeal the revocation

through an administrative hearing.

Q: I WANT TO OPEN A SMALL PERSONAL CARE HOME. HOW MUCH WILL THE

LICENSING FEES BE THE FIRST YEAR?

A: Assuming that you will be caring for no more than 24 residents, you will have to pay

an application fee of $300 and an initial licensure fee of $350, for a total of $650 the first

year.

Policies for Personal Care Homes are Here!

Hello everyone, the time has finally come!  Personal Care Home Policies are here and available to you.  If you’ve ever gone to a consultant for help with this, you know that they can charge into the thousands to write policies for you.  Well, now you can buy them one at a time, if  money is tight right now, which I bet it is (isn’t it for everyone?) I made the process simple and painless;  just pay a nominal charge, download and the policies are ready to be used as soon as you print them! How great is that?  Currently I am offering 14 different policies that you can select based on your needs.  You may need just one policy or all 14 its up to you!  Each policy is individually sold and priced to make it easier and more cost effective for you.  After years of requests from my wonderful loyal bloggers I wanted to make life a little easier for you as you embark on this path to operate a Personal Care Home.  It takes a loving caring person to get into this business to provide this service and I applaud each of you.

Take Care!

PERSONAL CARE HOME Policies for Sale coming soon!!!

I’ve gotten tons of feedback from folks all over the country and I appreciate each of you.  Because of the great out pouring and desire of so many to provide care for senior citizens, patients with alzeheimers /dementia, people with physical, mental health or mental retardation, and other vulnerable populations, I am creating a way for you to purchase policies that you can place in your facility.

For many, the task of creating the required policies is the single most challenging part of this business (remember that it is a business!). Many of us have the passion and desire to care for others but lack the time, energy or know-how to create policies and procedures for this service. Consultants charge hundreds, even thousands of dollars to create policies for you. I am creating way to offer policies to you in the most cost effective way.

Please give me your feedback as to what your needs are.  It is my hope to be able to provide this service to you as a way of thanks.  Of course, If you are able to write and create your own policies then I say, go for it!!!!  But for those who feel overwhelmed with establishing and writing you own policies, such as :Emergency Preparedness Plans, Death of a Resident, Managing Funds, Confidentiality, Serious and Unusual incidents, Complaints and Grievances, Medication Management policies, etc, etc. then this opportunity is for you.

Let me know the kinds of policy manuals or individual policies you are seeking.  Look out for an announcement from me soon!!!

More on Personal Care Homes

There have been so many comments about how to get started with a Personal Care Home.  Because we may all be in different States , it’s impossible for me to know every City/State rules and regulations concerning Personal Care Homes (PCH)  I would recommend that you read the first post I wrote on Personal Care homes and then all of the comments and responses following the post.  Then contact your State agency.  Try the Department of Human Resources, the Department of Human Services, Office of Regulatory Services, etc.  If you can’t locate the information from these sources, then visit a few PCH’s in your area and ask the owner, where to go to get started.  Some will actually help you!!  Remember that although your heart is in the right place when thinking of caring for others, it is still a business and other Personal Care Home providers may not be so willing to share information with you, they may feel threatened or territorial.  Still, others are very open and kind.  I believe that visiting several PCH’s is the best way to decide if this business is for you, to observe first hand how it’s done ( or not done) and to ask questions for immediate feedback.  For some of you, it might be feasible to start one in your own home to save on overhead costs.  If my home was up to standards, I would have started in my own home, having my family in the lower part of the house and the PCH residents in the upper half of the house.  Be creative, get ideas from other PCH’s to see how creative you can be.  Check out PCH in various neighborhoods, communities, and socio economic groups to get good ideas. You do not need to be in the medical field or have a medical background in most States. Some require a workshop or orientation to attend before getting licensed.  While others require you to complete a certificate program before getting started.  In Georgia, you have to go to a New Provider Orientation ( one day workshop) and once you get your certificate of completion, you mail it in with your PCH application.  Again, check with your local and State government for your specific requirements!!!!  Feel free to email me at pchpolicies@gmail.com