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Coaching for future Personal Care Home operators

Because of the overwhelming response I receive on a regular basis from people like you yearning to get into this business and from those who are seeking support and information about how to open a personal care home, I will be offering coaching via phone conference calls where we will discuss the nuts and bolts to opening up a personal care home from someone who has been in the industry and knows the industry. This call will help you gain access to information, get advice and ask your burning questions  to help you get your business going. How would you like that?

Send me your contact information (name, email and phone number) and I will send you the details of how to get started. I’m going to coach a small group  of dedicated and determined future PCH owners because as I have said before, no one helped me when I needed it (which is why I started this blog in the first place, to help people just like you!) so hurry because it will fill quickly!

Trust me, you will need the coaching and support from someone who knows this business to help  you establish your own business. Owning and operating a PCH is a great field to get into but it can be overwhelming and a lot to learn along the way.

For those that are serious about doing this awesome business go ahead and contact now while it’s on your mind.

Click on the link below to sign up for the Coaching before it’s too late (I don’t know how long I’ll offer this).

http://eepurl.com/bFkaWT

New PCH Application and Processing Fees in Georgia

In Georgia, effective August 3, 2010, the Rules and Regulations for General Licensing and

Enforcement Requirements, Chapter 111-8-25 require all licensed or registered

programs regulated through the Division of Healthcare Facility Regulation (HFR),

Department of Community Health to pay licensure activity fees annually beginning with

2010. Fees for currently licensed or registered programs with licenses or registrations

that do not expire annually must be paid by October 31, 2010.

Personal Care Homes** Annually

< 25 beds $350 Annually

25 < 50 beds $750 Annually

> 50 beds $1,500 Annually

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION

Q: MAY I PAY THE APPLICATION FEE AT THE TIME I FILE THE APPLICATION TO

BECOME LICENSED AND PAY THE INITIAL LICENSURE FEE WHEN YOU GET

READY TO ISSUE MY LICENSE?

A: No, the rules require you to submit the application fee and the initial licensure fee at

the same time.

Q: IF I OPERATE A LICENSED FACILITY AND I AM INSPECTED BECAUSE OF A

COMPLAINT THAT IS FILED, DO I HAVE TO PAY $250 FOR THE INSPECTION?

A: No. We do not charge for routine complaint inspection visits. You would be charged

$250 if we had to do a follow-up visit on a periodic or full inspection visit and more

serious rule violations were found. The purpose of that follow-up would be to check to

make sure that you corrected the more serious violation that was identified during the

periodic survey.

Q: WHAT IF I CAN’T PAY THE LICENSURE FEES THAT ARE DUE BY OCTOBER

31ST?

A: If you do not pay the fees within 60 days of the due date, October 31, 2010, a late

fee of $150 is added to the amount you owe. If you have not paid the full amount that is

due by January 31, 2011, the Department may take an action to revoke your license for

non-payment of licensure fees. You would have the right to appeal the revocation

through an administrative hearing.

Q: I WANT TO OPEN A SMALL PERSONAL CARE HOME. HOW MUCH WILL THE

LICENSING FEES BE THE FIRST YEAR?

A: Assuming that you will be caring for no more than 24 residents, you will have to pay

an application fee of $300 and an initial licensure fee of $350, for a total of $650 the first

year.

What’s your WHY?

I bet you are on this blog post, obviously, because you have a burning desire to do something different. You want to impact lives in a big way and want to provide great care to those that need just a little help and support, right?

In order to do that you should know, or at least, have a general idea about what drives you. Why do you want to do what you want to do?  In others words, what’s your why?

To help you figure this out, go ahead and ask yourself these few questions. Once you have taken some time out to really think about this, you should have your why question answered for you. Get ready, get set….go!!

So, what’s the mission of your business?

Why does your business exist?

What purpose does your business provide?

What problem do you solve?

Now, go  ahead and answer these few questions. If you get stuck, no worries, just think about it while taking a walk, a shower or when meditating. Your friends and family might also help you to remember why you want to get into this business (remember folks, it is a business). So, don’t be afraid to ask them. They may help to remind you of your qualities, experience, knowledge, gentleness, etc.

What ever your why is, it’s unique to just you!

 

10 Basic things you MUST have in your PCH

Every home is different and should provide supports and services to meet the unique needs of the residents. As you begin to think about what population you plan to support, it will become clear what items you will need to help your clientele feel comfortable, safe and right at home.

If you are supporting children, consider what you need in the home to effectively support children. Keep in mind that the needs of the adolescent teen are very different from the needs of small children.

For homes that are set up as Memory Care programs, its important to consider safety measures for residents at risk of wandering or elopement.

Whether you are planning to operate a personal care home for senior citizens, children, homeless veterans, or people with mental health challenges there are basic items that every PCH should have to ensure the health and safety of its residents..

Below are 10 basic items you must have in your home.

These are the basics and not in any way the only safety items needed. This list is not exhaustive. There are and will be many other items that are required by your licensing board, state government or that you personally find useful.

  1. Smoke Detectors
  2. Carbon Monoxide
  3. Fire Extinguishers
  4. Fire Ladder
  5. First Aid Kit
  6. Emergency Food Supply
  7. Flash lights
  8. Batteries
  9. Wheel Chair Ramps
  10. Bedside Commode

If your regulations allow it, you may need door alarms and arm bracelet for those at risk of wandering or eloping.

So check our the rules and regulations in your area for setting up and operating a personal care home and go get what you need!

 

 

Difference between a Personal Care Home and Assisted Living Community

Many people use the terms ‘Assisted Living Community’ and ‘Personal Care Home’ interchangeably. But did you know that there is difference?

A few years ago, Georgia  for instance, decided that they would not give a permit to a PCH that had the term ‘Assisted Living’ in its title.

For example an owner could not call their home “My House XYZ Assisted Living PCH”. In fact, some owners were required to remove the title from their PCH, that must have sucked!

When naming your PCH (Personal Care Home) make sure you do not use the term ‘Assisted Living’ in its title unless it truly is an Assisted Living Community. Check the rules and regulations for your state if you are not in Georgia.

So what is the difference you ask?

Well,  an Assisted living Community is a Personal Care Home but its for homes with 25 or more beds (that’s why its a COMMUNITY)! These are larger scale facilities that offer a myriad of services and supports.

If you have or considering less than 25 residents in your home, well you might be a PCH. In most cases, PCH’s are homes that support 2-10 people (depending on your area rules and regulations). Anything more than that is some other type of residential care arrangement.

In any event, check with the local licensing board in your area to confirm if this is true for you.

Hope this helps bring more clarity to your business vision!

 

Need Clarity? Lets connect!

I know how tough it is getting a PCH off the ground. You gotta get a house, furniture, permits, inspections, zoning, and people in it!

Stop making yourself dizzy and crazy from the uncertainty of it all.

I’ve given tons and tons of information already on this blog to help you for free but sometimes that’s still not enough.

For me, having that personal touch is essential to my understanding and feeling comfortable. Maybe that’s true for you too.

Anyway, go ahead and send me an email if you need a clarity call. I’ll give you a FREE 15 minute clarity call  if that will make you feel a little more confident and clear about your goals to owning a personal care home.

This post will be taken down soon so act fast because I really can’t do this for an extended period of time, sounds fair?

I’ll be looking out for your email.

Email me at pchpolicies@gmail.com

Talk to you soon!

Let’s Define Ownership

If you are or planning to be an owner of a Personal Care Home you should know the definition (according to Georgia Regs.) of an owner.

An “Owner” means any individual or any person affiliated with a corporation, partnership, or association with 10 percent or greater ownership interest in the facility providing care to persons under the license of the facility in this state and who:

1. purports to or exercises authority of the owner in a facility; or

2. applies to operate or operates a facility; or

3. maintains an office on the premises of a facility; or

4. resides at a facility; or

5. has direct access to persons receiving care at a facility; or

6. provides direct personal supervision of facility personnel by being immediately

available to provide assistance and direction during the time such facility services are being

provided; or

7. enters into a contract to acquire ownership of a facility.

Personal Care Home or Community Living Arrangement?

I think its admirable that you are considering opening a personal care home, or is it a community living arrangement?  Which one is right for you?

Community Living Arrangements (CLA) are for people with developmental disabilities only. In Georgia you can only have up to 4 adults living together with a developmental/intellectual disabilities in a CLA.

Is the home you have, approved with the zoning board?  Are the people you admit compatible with one another?  Do they have extreme behaviors that jeopardize their own health and safety as well as those around them. Important things to think about, right?.

Are you experience in the area of Developmental, Intellectual and other Mental Health issues. Look into this career path very seriously as it is a very challenging area to get into. If you do not have any experience then you will have a team that does.  This can be costly but someone must know the ins and outs of this population or you are setting yourself up to fail.

For me, I love it but it is very challenging work. There are countless rules and regulations to adhere to, but with the right team, you can do it!

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